Is eating eggs good or bad for my cholesterol ?

how much cholesterol in eggs

Eggs and Cholesterol

The Framingham Heart Study 1) has investigated the effect of host and environmental factors on the development of coronary heart disease since 1949. It concluded that within the range of egg intake of this population, differences in egg consumption were unrelated to blood cholesterol level or to coronary heart disease incidence. Most healthy people can eat up to seven eggs a week with no increase in their risk of heart disease. Some studies have shown that this level of egg consumption may actually prevent some types of strokes.

For years, the public have gotten the message that they should go easy on the egg especially the egg yolks. Long-vilified for their high cholesterol content by well-meaning doctors and scientists researching heart disease, eggs now seem to be making a bit of a comeback. So what changed?

The evidence to date doesn’t say you should ban eggs from your plate. In most studies so far, an egg a day does not have a negative impact on health 2). Interestingly, current studies 3) have tended to show that the consumption of eggs is not a risk factor of cardiovascular diseases in healthy people. However, people who are at high risk of cardiovascular diseases such as those with diabetes or hypertension need to have caution with dietary cholesterol intake, especially egg intake. Also, some people seem to be more sensitive to dietary cholesterol whose blood cholesterol level is highly correlated to dietary intake. Therefore, even though the recommendation of restricting cholesterol and egg consumption in American Heart Association 4) and 2015-2020 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee 5) has been eliminated, you still need to have caution with them based on the physiological status of people. On the other hand, the studies on the egg components impacting cardiovascular diseases risk showed that some egg components have potential protective effects on cardiovascular diseases, while others may have adverse effects. Due to the lack of complete data, the components of eggs that regulate cholesterol absorption and metabolism have not been extensively studied systematically. To solve the mystery of the relationship between egg cholesterol and blood cholesterol, it is essential to understand intestinal absorption of cholesterol from eggs and study the effect of cholesterol in eggs, and nutrients and cholesterol interactions in eggs. Also, the function of gut microbiota needs to be taken into consideration as well. Overall, in order to strengthen the basic research of egg functional components, understanding of the nutritional value of eggs can provide theoretical data for reasonable determination of the intake of eggs.

While it’s true that just one egg yolk has about 200 mg of cholesterol—making it one of the richest sources of dietary cholesterol—eggs also contain additional nutrients that may help lower the risk for heart disease. In addition, the moderate amount of fat in an egg, about 4.5 grams, is mostly monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fat, a fat that you need to be healthy. An egg contains only about 1.65 g of saturated fat and no trans fat. It’s also crucial to distinguish between dietary cholesterol and cholesterol in the blood, which are only weakly related. The focus on dietary cholesterol alone was de-emphasized as more attention was placed on the influence of saturated and trans fat on blood cholesterol. Accordingly, the Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2015 removed the prior recommendation to limit consumption of dietary cholesterol to 300 mg per day 6).

The egg is a powerhouse of disease-fighting nutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin. These carotenoids may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in older adults. And brain development and memory may be enhanced by the choline content of eggs.

But the full health benefits of eggs can only be realized if you store them properly — in the refrigerator — and cook them thoroughly to kill any potential bacteria.

Brown eggs are not more nutritious than white. The color and size of an egg are determined by the breed of hen, which can produce white, cream, brown, blue, green or speckled eggs. The color of the yolk is also not reflective of nutritional value but the type of poultry feed.

As part of a healthy balanced diet you can eat up to 6 eggs each week without increasing your risk of heart disease.

Chicken eggs are high in cholesterol, but the effect of egg consumption on blood cholesterol is minimal when compared with the effect of trans fats and saturated fats. According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one large egg has about 186 mg milligrams (mg) of cholesterol — all of which is found in the yolk.

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture, one large egg has about 186 mg milligrams (mg) of cholesterol — all of which is found in the yolk.

When deciding whether to include eggs in your diet, consider the recommended daily limits on cholesterol in your food:

  • If you are healthy, consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day.
  • If you have diabetes, high cholesterol or cardiovascular disease, limit the daily cholesterol intake to no more than 200 mg a day (<200 mg/ day).

If you like eggs but don’t want the extra cholesterol, use only the egg whites. Egg whites contain no cholesterol. You may also use cholesterol-free egg substitutes, which are made with egg whites.

Some people are more sensitive to eating cholesterol in their diet and its effect on their blood cholesterol level. This means that when they eat food containing cholesterol, their LDL (bad) cholesterol levels rise more than other people.

egg composition

Eggs and Health

Research on moderate egg consumption in two large prospective cohort studies (nearly 40,000 men and over 80,000 women) found that up to one egg per day is not associated with increased heart disease risk in healthy individuals 7). Of course, this research doesn’t give a green light to daily three-egg omelets. While a 2008 report from the Physicians’ Health Study supports the idea that eating an egg a day is generally safe for the heart, it also suggests that going much beyond that could increase the risk for heart failure later in life 8). You also need to pay attention to the “trimmings” that come with your eggs. To your cardiovascular system, scrambled eggs, salsa, and a 100% whole-wheat English muffin is a far different meal than scrambled eggs with cheese, sausages, home fries, and white toast.

People who have difficulty controlling their total and LDL “bad” cholesterol may also want to be cautious about eating egg yolks and instead choose foods made with egg whites. The same is true for people with diabetes. In studies including the Nurses’ Health Study and Health Professionals Follow-up Study, heart disease risk was increased among men and women with diabetes who ate one or more eggs a day 9), 10). For people who have diabetes and heart disease, it may be best to limit egg consumption to no more than three yolks per week.

Furthermore, to truly assess eggs and heart health, we need to examine how they stack-up to foods you might choose in their place—the classic nutrition substitution analysis.

Using some common breakfast options as an example:

  • While eggs may be a much better choice than sugary, refined grain-based options like sweetened breakfast cereals, pancakes with syrup, muffins, or bagels, they may fall short of other options. A bowl of steel-cut oats with nuts and berries, for example, will be a much better choice for heart health than an egg-centric breakfast. Consumption of whole grains and fruit predict lower risk of heart disease, and when it comes to protein, plant sources like nuts and seeds are related to lower cardiovascular and overall mortality, especially when compared to red meat or eggs 11).

The bottom line: while eggs may not be the optimal breakfast choice, they are certainly not the worst, falling somewhere in the middle on the spectrum food choice and heart disease risk. For those looking to eat a healthy diet, keeping intake of eggs moderate to low will be best for most, emphasizing plant-based protein options when possible.

how much cholesterol in eggs

Figure 1. Egg nutrition facts

egg-nutrition-facts
[Source 12)]

Do Eggs Cause High Cholesterol ?

Eggs were previously associated with heart disease risk as a result of their high cholesterol content. However, a solid body of research shows that for most people, cholesterol in food has a smaller effect on blood levels of total cholesterol and harmful LDL cholesterol than does the mix of fats in the diet 13), 14), 15). Dietary cholesterol and egg yolks do raise fasting levels of LDL cholesterol, by around 10%, in a dose-dependent manner 16), 17). But most healthy people don’t need to worry about eating eggs and their cholesterol. The cholesterol in eggs has almost no effect on our blood cholesterol levels. Your cholesterol levels are more influenced by the saturated and trans fat (and the added sugar) you eat. That is the saturated fat has a much greater effect on fasting LDL when it is consumed with cholesterol 18); this has been called the “bacon and egg” effect 19). In other words, your risk of heart disease may be more closely tied to the foods that accompany the eggs in a traditional American breakfast — such as the sodium in the bacon, sausages and ham, and the saturated fat or oils with trans fats used to fry the eggs and the hash browns.

People believed that if you ate cholesterol, that it would raise cholesterol in the blood and contribute to heart disease. It turns out that it isn’t that simple. The more you eat of cholesterol, the less your body produces instead. So the total amount of cholesterol in the body changes only very little (if at all), it is just coming from the diet instead of from the liver 20), 21).

Most healthy people can eat up to seven eggs a week with no increase in their risk of heart disease. Some studies have shown that this level of egg consumption may actually prevent some types of strokes 22).

  • The majority of studies found that egg consumption did not affect major cardiovascular disease risk factors. Consumption of 6 to 12 eggs per week had no impact on plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, low-density (LDL) lipoprotein-cholesterol, triglycerides, fasting glucose, insulin or C-reactive protein in all studies that reported these outcomes in comparison with control groups 23). An increase in high-density (HDL) lipoprotein-cholesterol with egg consumption was observed in 4 of 6 studies. Results from randomized controlled trials suggest that consumption of 6 to 12 eggs per week, in the context of a diet that is consistent with guidelines on cardiovascular health promotion, has no adverse effect on major cardiovascular disease risk factors in individuals at risk for developing diabetes or with type 2 diabetes. The studies reported inconclusive results regarding the relationship between egg consumption (and dietary cholesterol) and the risk for cardiovascular diseases in individuals with type 2 diabetes.
  • A review of egg consumption and heart health 24), it was concluded that consuming three eggs per day for 12 weeks did not increase cardiovascular disease risk in individuals with metabolic syndrome. Consuming a cholesterol free egg substitute does not decrease an individuals risk for developing cardiovascular disease risk factors, relative to whole eggs. Eggs are a bioavailable source of xanthophyll carotenoids, which have been shown to play a role in decreasing inflammation.
  • This review 25) addresses the effect of eggs on cardiovascular disease risk from both epidemiological research and controlled prospective studies, in people with and without cardio-metabolic disease. It also examines the nutritional qualities of eggs and whether they may offer protection against chronic disease. The evidence suggests that a diet including more eggs than is recommended (at least in some countries) may be used safely as part of a healthy diet in both the general population and for those at high risk of cardiovascular disease, those with established coronary heart disease, and those with type 2 diabetes mellitus. In conclusion, an approach focused on a person’s entire dietary intake as opposed to specific foods or nutrients should be the heart of population nutrition guidelines.

But in another conflicting study 26), it was found that the very high cholesterol content of egg yolk, the phosphatidylcholine in egg yolk leads, via action of the intestinal microbiome, to production of trimethylamine n-oxide (TMAO), which causes atherosclerosis in animal models. Levels of trimethylamine n-oxide (TMAO) in the top quartile after a test dose of two egg yolks were associated with a 2.5-fold increase in the 3-year risk of stroke, death, or myocardial infarction among patients referred for coronary angiography. Persons at risk of cardiovascular disease should limit their intake of cholesterol and egg yolk. The authors concluded that gegular consumption of egg yolks should be avoided by people at risk of cardiovascular disease and “in our opinion, stopping egg consumption after a myocardial infarction or stroke would be like quitting smoking after lung cancer is diagnosed: a necessary act, but late.”

  • Dietary cholesterol and egg yolks have important harmful effects in the post-prandial state, and increase the risk of cardiovascular events. New understanding of the role of the intestinal microbiome will revolutionize our approaches to diet and cardiovascular disease. Regular consumption of egg yolks should be avoided by people at risk of cardiovascular disease, which essentially means all North Americans who expect to live past middle age. “Stopping the consumption of egg yolks after a stroke or myocardial infarction would be like quitting smoking after a diagnosis of lung cancer.” 27).
  • Much more important than the effects on fasting lipids are the post-prandial effects 28). Diet is not just about fasting cholesterol; it is mainly about the postprandial effects of cholesterol, saturated fats, oxidative stress and inflammation. In human subjects, endothelial function is impaired for approximately 4 h after consumption of a high-fat/high-cholesterol meal; this effect is probably due to oxidative stress 29).
  • Dietary cholesterol above 140 mg in a single meal markedly potentiates post-prandial lipemia 30). High dietary intake of cholesterol increases LDL oxidation by nearly 40% 31), 32), and impairs endothelial function for several hours, probably through oxidative stress 33), 34), 35).
  • A high-cholesterol meal increases vascular inflammation for several hours 36), and an egg-white-based substitute improved endothelial function compared with whole eggs 37).
  • In Greece, where the diet is much more healthy, it was easier to show harm from egg consumption. A study by Trichopoulou et al. in Greek diabetics showed that an egg a day increased coronary risk 5-fold, and each 10 g of egg per day (about a 6th of a large egg) doubled cardiovascular risk.
  • In this large prospective study, the authors have demonstrated that daily consumption of at least one egg is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in both men and women, independently of traditional risk factors for type 2 diabetes 38).
  • In a prospective cohort study of 21,275 participants from the Physicians’ Health Study I, where study was trying to find the association between egg consumption and heart failure risk. After an average follow up of 20.4 years, while egg consumption up to 6 times per week was not associated with incident heart failure, egg consumption of 7 or more per week was associated with an increased risk of heart failure. Their data suggested that infrequent egg consumption is not associated with the risk of heart failure. However, consumption of 1 or more eggs per day (more than 7 eggs per week) is related to an increased risk of heart failure among US male physicians.

Effect of egg intake on blood cholesterol and cardiovascular diseases in human studies

The effects of egg intake on blood cholesterol and cardiovascular diseases have been discussed in several meta-analysis studies using research data collected over 60 years 39), 40). Large epidemiological works have been conducted to investigate the effect of egg intake on blood cholesterol levels and risk of cardiovascular diseases in children 41), young people 42), women 43), men 44), and older adults 45). Some have shown that egg consumption did influence the blood cholesterol level but did not increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases in healthy people 46). Meanwhile, other studies reported that high dietary cholesterol intake due to egg consumption is a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and diabetes 47), 48), 49). The results of epidemiological studies and human intervention studies on the relationship of dietary egg intake and cardiovascular diseases risks are summarized in Table 1. Even though American Heart Association 50) and 2015-2020 US Dietary Guidelines Advisory Committee 51) have removed the restriction of dietary cholesterol for healthy people in USA, there still are different conclusions due to differences in race, genetic makeup, physical fitness, and especially physiological status 52).

Among the 19 prospective studies investigating the effect of dietary egg intake on cardiovascular diseases risks, 6 studies reported positive correlation between egg consumption and different types of cardiovascular diseases incidents or mortality in healthy people 53). Pang (2017) reported the positive correlation with total cholesterol 54), and Spence (2012) reported the positive correlation with plaque area 55). However, other studies (11 out of 19) reported no difference on the cardiovascular diseases risks affected by the amount of egg intake 56). The adverse effect of egg consumption is observed in population with high risk of cardiovascular diseases, including people with diabetes or hypercholesterolemia, and who are sensitive to dietary cholesterol 57). Diabetic populations are in the high risk of cardiovascular diseases with two to four folds higher than healthy people. These studies also showed that diabetic people are more vulnerable to cardiovascular diseases after egg consumption 58), with a doubling of coronary risk with an egg per day in US population 59), and 5-fold risk in Greece population 60). Meanwhile, some studies found that high egg consumption increased the risk of gestational diabetes mellitus 61), insulin resistance 62), and the risk of diabetes 63). Therefore, the effect of egg consumption on cardiovascular diseases might be mediated by diabetes.

Almost all human intervention studies showed the serum LDL “bad” cholesterol and HDL “good” cholesterol levels increased in high egg consuming groups (1 to 3 eggs per day comparing to no egg or with egg substitute), while the ratio of serum LDL “bad” cholesterol to HDL “good” cholesterol (LDL/HDL) is unchanged (see Table 1). Most of these papers concluded that egg consumption is not a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, based on the fact that the LDL/HDL ratio is unchanged because this ratio is thought to be a stronger risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. However, serum LDL “bad” cholesterol level alone should still be considered as a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. This is especially true for those people whose blood cholesterol level is more sensitive to dietary cholesterol consumption. There are good reasons for the recommendation that persons at risk of vascular disease limit cholesterol to 200 mg/day 64). The very high cholesterol content of egg yolk (237 mg in a 65-gram egg) is a problem in itself, and even one large egg yolk exceeds that limit. Other studies reported the high cholesterol and high lipid diet could induce the inflammation in plasma, which is thought to contribute to atherosclerosis 65), and the susceptibility of LDL “bad” cholesterol to be oxidized could be increased by dietary cholesterol 66).

Table 1. Epidemiological and human intervention studies on the effect of dietary egg intake and cardiovascular diseases risks

(a) Prospective studies

ReferenceParticipantsAgeFollow-up (years)OutcomeResult b
MaleFemale
Bernstein 2011 67)43,15084,01030-7526Incident stroke(-)
Burke 2007 68)25625815-8814CHD, mortality
Dawber 1982 69)91230-5924Incident CHD and blood cholesterol level(-)
Djoussé 2008 70)21,327040-8520Incident MI and stroke(-)
Mortality
Goldberg 2014 71)57285757-7511Incident stroke(-)
Carotid atherosclerosis
Haring 2014 72)12,06645-6422Incident CHD(-)
Houston 2011 73)864107770-799Incident CVD↑ especially in diabetic people
Hu 1999 74)37,85180,08234-7514Incident stroke and CHD(-) while in diabetic people may have ↑ effect
Mann 1997 75)4,1026,70016-7913.3Ischemic heart disease mortality
Nakamura 2004 76)5,1864,07730-7014Stroke and CHD mortality↑ in women
Nakamura 2006 77)43,31947,41640-6910.2Incident CHD(-)
Qureshi 2006 78)3,7565,97825-7415.9All stroke, CAD(-) while in diabetic people may have ↑ effect
Sauvaget 2003 79)15,35024,99934-10316Stroke mortality(-)
Scrafford 2011 80)14,946>178.8CHD and Stroke mortality(-)
Zazpe 2011 81)6,1708,01520-905.8Incident CVD(-)
Voutilainen 2013 82)1,019051.9 (Mean)18.8Carotid atherosclerosis, incident MI(-)
Pang 2017 83)8,1318,463>60N/ASerum LDL and total cholesterol
Spence 2012 84)66959346-77N/ACarotid plaque area
Trichopoulou 2006 85)42458950-80 (Adult diabetics)4.5 (mean)Mortality

(b) Human intervention

ReferenceParticipantsAgeIntervention time (weeks)Intervention methodOutcomeResult a
MaleFemale
Missimer 2017 86)242618-3011c2 eggs/day vs. oatmealSerum LDL and HDL
Serum LDL/HDL(-)
Serum ghrelin↑ satiety

Lemos 2018 87)161418-20133 eggs/day vs. choline bitartrate supplementSerum LDL and HDL
Serum LDL/HDL(-)
SREBPs and HMG-CoA reductase level↓ cholesterol biosynthesis

Herron 2002 88)05118-49 (pre-menopausal)11c1 egg/day vs.
0 egg/day
Serum LDL and HDL
Serum LDL/HDL(-)
CETP level↑ reverse cholesterol transport

Herron 2003 89)40018-5711c1 egg/day vs.
0 egg/day
Serum LDL and HDL
Serum LDL/HDL↑ only in hyper-respondersd
CETP, LCAT level↑ reverse cholesterol transport

Mutungi 2008 90)28040-70 (overweight/obese)12CRD:
3 eggs/day vs. SUB
Serum LDL/HDL(-)
Serum HDL

Greene 2005 91)1329>6011c3 eggs/day vs. SUBSerum LDL and HDL
Serum LDL/HDL(-)

Ballesteros 2004 92)25298-1211c2 eggs/day vs. SUBSerum LDL/HDL(-)

Knopp 2003 93)7811943-6740, 2 and 4 eggs/daySerum LDL and HDL

Knopp 1997 94)864541-68 (HC or HL)122 eggs/day vs. SUBSerum LDL↑ in HC
Serum HDL↑ in both HL and HC

Abbreviations: CHD = coronary heart disease; CVD = cardiovascular disease; MI = myocardial infarction; LDL = low-density lipoprotein; HDL = high-density lipoprotein; SREBP = sterol regulatory element-binding protein; CETP = cholesteryl ester transfer protein; LCAT = lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase; CRD = Carbohydrate-restricted diets; SUB = cholesterol-free, fat-free egg substitute; HC = hypercholesterolemia; HL = hyperlipidemia;

Footnote: b) ↑ increase, ↓ decrease, (-) no influence; c) Intervention time contain a 3-weeks washout time within the intervention period; dhyperresponders: increase in total cholesterol of ≥0.06 mmol/L for each additional 100 mg of dietary cholesterol consumed.

[Source 95) ]

Table 2. Egg lipids

NameEgg, Whole, RawEgg Yolk, Raw
Average Content (g/100g)Min. Value (g/100g)Max. Value (g/100g)Average Content (g/100g)Min. Value (g/100g)Max. Value (g/100g)
FA saturated2.640.053.138.477.139.55
FA 4:0<0.05020
FA 6:0<0.0500
FA 8:0<0.0500.009
FA 10:0<0.0500.009
FA 12:0<0.0500.009
FA 14:00.02400.0380.0910.0770.1
FA 16:01.960.052.436.045.036.86
FA 18:00.650.050.891.732.42
FA monounsaturated3.660.056.7311.910.213.8
FA 18:1 n-9 cis3.513.033.6510.49.6911.2
FA polyunsaturated1.650.053.394.073.334.66
FA 18:2 9c,12c (n-6)1.381.182.73.283.62
FA 18:3 9c,12c,15c (n-3)0.0610.020.580.150.27
FA 20:4 5c,8c,11c,14c (n-6)0.120.130.370.4
FA 20:5 5c,8c,11c,14c,17c (n-3) EPA00.0030.010.011
FA 22:6 4c,7c,10c,13c,16c,19c (n-3) DHA0.090.0450.180.250.110.46
Cholesterol0.3980.3440.4230.9391.280

Abbreviations: FA = fatty acids; EPA = eicosapentaenoic acid (omega-3 fatty acid); DHA = docosahexaenoic acid (omega-3 fatty acid); NA = not available.

[Source 96) ]
egg and cholesterol

Nutrition Content of Eggs

  • 2 x 60g eggs
  • % Recommended Dietary Intakes (RDI)

Table 3. Egg nutrition facts

Nutrients

RDI*

Per 100g

Per serve

%RDI

Energy (kJ)

8,700

559

581

7%

Protein (g)

50

12.2

12.7

25%

Fat (g)

70

9.9

10.3

15%

Sat fat (g)

24

3.3

3.4

14%

Mono fat (g)

n/a

5.1

5.3

n/a

Poly fat (g)

n/a

1.6

1.7

n/a

Cholesterol (mg)

n/a

383

398

n/a

Carbohydrate (g)

310

1.3

1.4

0%

Sugars (g)

90

0.3

0.3

0%

Sodium (mg)

2300

136

141

6%

Potassium (mg)

2800 (f), 3800 (m)^

133

138

4-5%

Magnesium (mg)

320

12

13

4%

Calcium (mg)

800

47

49

6%

Phosphorus (mg)

1000

200

208

21%

Iron (mg)

12

1.6

1.7

14%

Selenium (µg)

70

39

41

59%

Zinc (mg)

12

0.5

0.5

4%

Iodine (µg)

150

41

43

29%

Thiamin (Vitamin B1) (mg)

1.1

0.12

0.12

11%

Riboflavin (Vitamin B2) (mg)

1.7

0.5

0.5

29%

Niacin (mg)

10

<0.01~

<0.01~

n/a

Vitamin B6 (mg)

1.6

0.05

0.05

3%

Vitamin B12 (µg)

2

0.8

0.8

40%

Pantothenic acid (vitamin B5) (mg)

5

2

2.1

42%

Folate (µg)

200

93

97

49%

Vitamin A (Retinol) (µg)

750

230

239

32%

Vitamin D (Cholecalciferol) (µg)

10

0.8

0.8

8%

Vitamin E (Alpha-tocopherol) (mg)

10

2.3

2.4

24%

Omega – 3 fatty acids (total) (g)

0.89 (f), 1.46 (m)^

0.17

0.18

12-20%

Short chain Omega-3s (ALA) (g)

0.8 (f), 1.3 (m)^

0.06

0.06

5-8%

Long chain Omega-3s (DHA/DPA) (mg)

90 (f), 160 (m)^

110

114

71-127%

Omega-6 fatty acids (g)

8 (f), 13 (m)^

1.37

1.42

11-18%

Lutein (mg)

n/a

0.38

0.40

n/a

Zeaxanthin (mg)

n/a

0.13

0.14

n/a

Lutein + zeaxanthin (mg)

n/a

0.51

0.53

n/a

Biotin (µg)

30

<8~

<8~

n/a

Fluoride (mg)

3 (f), 4 (m)^

<1~

<1~

n/a

Chromium (mg)

0.2

<0.01~

<0.01~

n/a

Copper (mg)

3

<0.02~

<0.02~

n/a

Manganese (mg)

5

0.023

0.024

0%

Molybdenum (mg)

0.25

0.012

0.012

5%

Vitamin K (µg)

80

<2~

<2~

n/a

Table 4. Nutrient values of a medium-size boiled egg, whole milk with added vitamin D, and boiled manufacturing beef

CategoryBoiled eggWhole milk with added vitamin DBoiled manufacturing beef

NutrientUnit1 large egg
(50.0 g)
Value
(100 g)
Value
(100 g)
Value
(100 g)

Approximates
Energykcal7815561126
Waterg37.3174.6288.1373.1
Proteing6.2912.583.1524.21
Total lipid (fat)g5.310.613.253.26
Carbohydrate, by differenceg0.561.124.80
 Fiber, total dietaryg0000
 Sugars, totalg0.561.125.050

Minerals
 Calcium, Camg25501136
 Iron, Femg0.591.190.031.78
 Magnesium, Mgmg5101016
 Phosphorus, Pmg8617284129
 Potassium, Kmg63126132183
 Sodium, Namg621244332
 Zinc, Znmg0.531.050.375.02

Vitamins
 Vitamin C, total ascorbic acidmg0000
 Thiaminmg0.0330.0660.0460.042
 Riboflavinmg0.2570.5130.1690.096
 Niacinmg0.0320.0640.0891.759
 Vitamin B6mg0.060.1210.0360.16
 Folate, DFEμg224450
 Vitamin B12μg0.561.110.451.02
 Vitamin A, RAEμg74149468
 Vitamin A, IUIU26052016227
 Vitamin E (α-tocopherol)mg0.521.030.070.57
 Vitamin D (D2 + D3)μg1.12.21.30.1
 Vitamin DIU4487515
 Vitamin K (phylloquinone)μg0.10.30.30

Lipids
 SFAsbg1.6333.2671.8651.154
 MUFAsbg2.0384.0770.8120.897
 PUFAsbg0.7071.4140.1950.246
 Trans fatty acidsg0000.078
 Cholesterolmg1863731067

Footnote: a) Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion

Abbreviations: SFAs = saturated fatty acids, MUFAs = monounsaturated fatty acids, and PUFAs = polyunsaturated fatty acids.

[Source 97) ]

Figure 1. Egg nutrients

Egg nutrients

Footnote: Basic composition of edible parts of the egg. (a) Egg white; (b) Egg yolk. Note that for (b), results refer to egg yolk/vitelline membrane complex.

[Source 98) ]

Eggs contain the highest quality protein and are often used as a standard to measure the quality of other protein sources. A single large egg provides 12 percent of the daily requirement of protein for 70 calories 99). Eggs also have the highest biological value of any protein, meaning that the essential amino acids they provide are used very efficiently by the body. Eggs also contain varying amounts of vitamins A, D, E, K, B6, B12, folate, and a variety of minerals (particularly riboflavin, phosphorus, and iron). Because eggs are very easy to digest, they are frequently included in therapeutic diets.

The yolk makes up just over one third of an egg. It provides three-fourths of the calories, all of the fat-soluble vitamins (A, D, E, and K), and all of the choline, lutein, and zeaxanthin. The yolk also provides most of the phosphorus, iron, and folate and almost half of the protein and riboflavin. The white (albumen) provides more than half of the total protein and riboflavin. Choline, an essential nutrient, is shown to be important for proper brain development in the fetus and newborn and may play a role in memory function throughout life and into old age. Lutein and zeaxanthin may prevent macular degeneration, a leading cause of blindness in the elderly in the U.S.

Though these nutrients are present only in small amounts in eggs, research shows that they may be more bioavailable, or absorbed and utilized by the body, when obtained from egg yolk than from richer sources.

When deciding whether to include eggs in your diet, consider the recommended daily limits on cholesterol in your food:

  • If you are healthy, consume no more than 300 mg of cholesterol a day.
  • If you have diabetes, high cholesterol or cardiovascular disease, limit the daily cholesterol intake to no more than 200 mg a day.
  • If you like eggs but don’t want the extra cholesterol, use only the egg whites. Egg whites contain no cholesterol. You may also use cholesterol-free egg substitutes, which are made with egg whites.

The risk of heart disease may be more closely tied to the foods that accompany the eggs in a traditional American breakfast — such as the sodium in the bacon, sausages and ham, and the saturated fat or oils with trans fats used to fry the eggs and the hash browns.

Tips for eating eggs 100)

  • The healthiest ways to cook eggs are to boil, poach or scramble them using reduced fat milk.
  • Eggs are always available and easy to cook quickly – faster than getting takeaway.
  • Eggs make great lunchbox fillers for adults and children and are very portable when hard boiled.

To lower cholesterol levels the National Heart Foundation recommends the following:

  • Be smoke-free
  • Achieve and maintain a healthy body weight
  • Choose polyunsaturated or monounsaturated oils
  • Choose foods such as wholegrain bread and cereals, brown rice, wholemeal, pasta, vegetables, fruits, legumes (e.g. chick peas, kidney beans and lentils), lean meats and poultry, oily fish and reduced, low or no fat dairy  products
  • Consume plant sterol enriched foods as part of a health eating plan
  • Limit cholesterol-rich foods if advised to do so
  • Limit alcohol intake to no more than 2 standard drinks per day for men and women
  • Get at least 30 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity on most, if not all, days of the week.

Conclusion

Eggs are really nutritious and it’s fine to have them regularly as part of a healthy diet. Eggs contain of disease-fighting nutrients like lutein and zeaxanthin. These carotenoids may reduce the risk of age-related macular degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in older adults. And brain development and memory may be enhanced by the choline content of eggs. Eggs contain good quality protein, 11 vitamins and minerals, and are a source of healthy fats including omega-3 fats.

As part of a healthy balanced diet you can eat up to 6 eggs each week without increasing your risk of heart disease.

However, if you have high cholesterol, type 2 diabetes or cardiovascular disease, limit your egg daily cholesterol intake to no more than 200 mg a day (<200 mg/ day).

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